Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis last month announced it planned to demolish the Drake, a nearby, 91-year-old apartment building it owns, with the goal of using the space—at least for now—for additional parking.

But historic preservationists want to save the building, and urbanists say the region needs more affordable housing, especially given that the Drake sits near a stop for the soon-to-open Red Line rapid transit route.

IBJ reporter Hayleigh Colombo talks about the controversy—the possibilities for the building—with podcast host Mason King. They explore whether moving the building is an option, whether Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission might step in and what the role the city could play in the process.

To read more, check out Colombo's story here

This episode of the IBJ Podcast is sponsored by Krieg DeVault.

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The Blue Indy electric-car-sharing service launched in Indianapolis in 2015. It had its detractors, but you couldn’t fault the service’s backers for being timid.

Basing Blue Indy on a service that had tens of thousands of subscribers in Paris, they predicted that by 2020 the company would be profitable and have at least 15,000 members, 200 charging stations, and 500 electric cars on the road.

Wholeheartedly supported by the Ballard administration, Blue Indy carved out curb-side stations for its vehicles in some of the city’s busiest areas. The city of Indianapolis invested $6 million to help get it off the ground, with a profit-sharing plan that would kick in once the company was profitable and its own considerable investment was recouped.

That won’t be in 2020, or at any time soon. While Blue Indy has grown significantly since its inception and its numbers are on the upswing, it’s still not close to the results it initially projected.

In this week’s edition of The IBJ Podcast, Blue Indy’s local market chief admits that the original predictions for Indianapolis were too optimistic, being based on the performance in Paris. It won’t be in the black next year, and profitability “is going to be a few years away,” he said.

“The mobility industry is a tough industry to make money at, and it really is a long-term project to offer members the different services they want, the locations they want and the use cases they want,” said James Delgado, managing director for Blue Indy.

 

This episode of the IBJ Podcast is sponsored by Krieg DeVault.

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This isn’t your just father’s weekend retreat or mother’s opportunity to binge on bridge. Not anymore.

Country clubs across the nation are in the midst of a transformation as the latest generation of breadwinners decide how they want to spend their leisure time and disposable incomes.

As the conventional wisdom goes, millennials are fiercely independent, burdened by college debt and skeptical of traditional institutions. But research by the golf and country cub industry indicates that some in the demographic are looking for a local place to get away with their children for secluded family time, as well as the traditional advantages of forging career and social connections.

To attract millennials, clubs in the Indianapolis area are updating their facilities, beefing up their recreational offerings for kids, adding activities that would appeal to young adults and adjusting the way they charge for memberships. They’re also trying to air out any remaining whiffs of snob appeal, so delightfully skewered by the classic film comedy “Caddyshack.”

In the latest edition of The IBJ Podcast, host Mason King gets the lowdown from reporter Samm Quinn on how central Indiana’s clubs are changing, while they get the national perspective from Jeff Morgan, CEO of the Club Management Association of America.

This episode of the IBJ Podcast is sponsored by Krieg DeVault.

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Husband-and-wife team Kim and Todd Saxton, both professors at the IU Kelley School of Business at IUPUI, have spent a lot of time inside and outside the classroom serving as mentors to startup founders trying to make their way through the choppy waters of entrepreneurship.

So they recently teamed up with Michael Cloran, a local entrepreneur and partner at DeveloperTown, to write a book of advice about what NOT to do when you're starting a company. The book—“The Titanic Effect: Successfully Navigating the Uncertainties that Sink Most Startups”—uses the tragedy of the Titanic as its outline, detailing some of the icebergs (which the authors call "debtbergs") that founders face in their journeys to success or sometimes failure.

Host Mason King talked to the Saxtons about the biggest problems that entrepreneurs face and how to tackle them—and they explain how they faced some of those same problems as they crafted their book.

You can learn more about one of the key problems startups face—finding a match between a product and customers—in this week's IBJ.

This episode of the IBJ Podcast is sponsored by Krieg DeVault.

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In residential real estate, the 30-year-mortgage is king. But why?

A 15-year mortgage saves you money, reduces your expenses later and helps you be more realistic about how much house you really need, says Peter Dunn, better known as Pete the Planner.

Pete talks with guest host Lesley Weidenbener about all things mortgages—determining how much house you can afford, why you shouldn't put down less than 10% and why the idea of starter homes and family homes is silly.

And Pete explains why those mortgage calculators you can get online are one of the worst things to happen to family finances.

You can also read Pete's column about the 15-year mortgage at IBJ.com.

This episode of the IBJ Podcast is sponsored by Krieg DeVault.

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Morales Group launched in 2003 with a focus on placing Hispanic workers into jobs, but the company has grown and expanded—both in geography and in the people it serves.

Today, about half of the people Morales Group places are migrants, immigrants or refugees. In fact, 37 countries are represented by Morales Group’s internal employees and the associates the company has placed.

That means the $100 million firm spends more money upfront to solve language barriers and provide training. But Seth Morales—the company's president and the son of the founder—says that investment pays off later for the workers, Morales Group and the manufacturers, distributors and other companies that are its clients.

Morales talks to podcast host Mason King about the company's culture and mission, the challenges and opportunities presented by the tight labor market, and how his standout college football career at Purdue University impacted his career.

To read more about Morales Group, check out this story by IBJ's Sorell Grow

IBJ photo/Eric Learned

This episode of the IBJ Podcast is sponsored by Krieg DeVault.

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Should you avoid red meat? No. Will gum last in your stomach seven years? No way. Should you strive for 10,000 steps a day? Not unless you just want to.

So says Dr. Aaron Carroll, a pediatrician and researcher at the Indiana University School of Medicine who sees it as his life’s calling to debunk what he considers health myths and weak medical research. He writes books and a column for The New York Times, hosts "Healthcare Triage" on YouTube and tweets at @aaronecarroll, all with the goal of educating the public about health issues. 

Dr. Carroll answers questions from podcast host Mason King about probiotics, sodium, sunscreen, marijuana and more, and he explains why we all—doctors included—misinterpret health care research.

To learn more about Dr. Carroll, read IBJ reporter John Russell's profile at IBJ.com.

IBJ photo by Daniel Axler

This episode of the IBJ Podcast is sponsored by Krieg DeVault.

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Two-and-a-half years after selling his namesake restaurant chain Scotty's, entrepreneur Scott Wise is launching another eatery. Roots Burger Bar will be located in the same Muncie location as his original restaurant but will have a more casual feel and tighter menu.

Wise tells IBJ Podcast host Mason King that he's both emotional and excited about the new start, which he says has been like hitting control-alt-delete on his career.

But it hasn't been an easy path. Wise explains why he believed selling Scotty's was a good move, why he planned to stay with the company that bought it for five years and what happened to make him leave so quickly. He also talks about the impact his parents and a near-death experience had on his life.

Scotty’s Holdings LLC, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in December and has closed several restaurants, did not return a request for comment about Wise's comments in the podcast. 

IBJ reporter Susan Orr has more about Wise's new Roots restaurant

This edition of the IBJ Podcast is sponsored by the Office of Minority and Women Business Development.

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One of the hottest trends in employee retention and recruitment isn't ping pong table and kegs of beer in the break room; it's giving workers paid time so they can volunteer their time with local charities.

Josh Driver, founder of Selfless.ly, which sells cloud-based software for managing corporate social responsibility programs, says volunteer PTO is an increasingly important part of benefits packages. In fact, nearly one quarter of companies now pay employees to spend their time and energy with a not-for-profit.

Host Mason King talks with Driver about why workers—especially millennials—are so interested in volunteer PTO and why it's good for companies, too. Plus, he offers tips for setting up a volunteer PTO program and says no company is too small to do it.

You can learn more about corporate volunteerism in IBJ's latest Impact Indiana section.

The photo for this week's podcast is courtesy of Pepper Construction.

This edition of the IBJ Podcast is sponsored by the Office of Minority and Women Business Development.

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The Indianapolis Public Library system is in a growth tear—in terms of both its buildings and its programming.

Three library branches have recently opened or are under construction and three more are in various planning stages. That's in addition to five branches that have or will soon undergo significant renovations.

Host Mason King talks with the library system's CEO, Jackie Nytes, about the construction binge and how it will actually help the library better balance its budget. And Nytes also describes the how the new buildings and renovations better support the needs of neighborhoods and the people who live there.

The books are still there of course. But Indy libraries are about much more: Think job training, video streaming, live animals and a seed library. King and Nytes get into all the details in this week's episode.

If you need even more, check out IBJ reporter Hayleigh Colombo's story about the library changes.

 

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